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   8. THREE PONDS RESERVATION

Size
281.6 acres

Description
All of the land bank’s central Chappaquiddick preserves are amalgamated in this reservation. The eponymous three ponds — Brine’s, Buttonbush and Winterberry — are arrayed along the spine of the cross-Chappaquiddick trail. Noteworthy are the wild fields along the Old Indian Trail; the Brine’s Pond itself, which hosts an island of beetlebung trees situated in the water like an iris in an eye; and the new farm opposite the pond, where rows of summer vegetables follow the contours of the fields.

Uses
nature study, hiking, picnicking, mountain-biking, horseback-riding, dog-walking (leashing required April 1 - August 31), hunting (with permission), fishing, kayaking, farming, scenic vista, universal access (moderate terrain) off Old Indian Trail.                         

Access
Turn right off the Chappaquiddick Road 1.7 miles past the ferry slip. Trailhead, shared with the Chappaquiddick community center, is here; bicycle rack is just up the Chappy Road on the right near the pond.

Historical Highlights

  • the name “Chappaquiddick” derives from the Algonquin name Tchepi-cquiden-et, which translates into “the separate island”. 

  • settlers purchased the island from the Wampanoag natives in 1653; it was used predominantly for cattle grazing and the livestock roamed free of fences as the surrounding waters acted as a fence

     

     


Trail / Property Map

Click to View           

Click to view cross-chappy trail map

Features                                                             

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

biking hiking picnicing mountain biking dog walking horseback riding